Friday, January 8, 2021

A vote for notes of fairness



Someone who is interested in the notion of public sphere these days caused me
to reply with some references and comment that I want to share, but expand.

Coincidently, New York Times journalist Thomas Edsall has this week re-raised issues of free speech with legal scholars in view of the authoritarian behavior of Trump (nothing new!—but now more dangerous than ever) and in view of the free reign of right-wing opinion in “viral” social spaces.

That dramatizes how philosophy of law is not basically about academic dispute. It’s about how we make and keep society good, humane, and, to my mind—and to Habermas, surely—make and keep society pragmatically progressive, which is also to say progressively pragmatic.

And that’s not mere academicism. What we are to do pertains to the scale of relevance that is each person’s daily life: being well, always being open to learning fundamentally new ways of thinking, and promoting community.

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Heidegger studies, 2020



I’ve simplified the main/top level of the project, which divides into five kinds
of interest:
  • sharing Heidegger’s interests reliably for new readers;
  • regarding scholarship about Heidegger as topic (barely begun); 
  • sharing my own engagement with Heidegger’s texts;
  • defending good faith reading of Heidegger relative to his political times; and
  • prospecting the usefulness of Heidegger’s ways for our century (barely begun). 
This has involved changing the section location of some discussions (not the urls of any discussion), so that some embedded discussions become more readily evident, particularly: 
  • an introduction to Contributions to Philosophy: from enowning, which has been expanded.
  • a discussion of Heidegger’s Considerations
  • and discussions about three controversial passages in Heidegger’s notebooks.

Saturday, December 26, 2020

autumn 2020


See the site home page for the current update.

I’m immersed in work unrelated to the aims of the website. But I have a huge set of notes for future work here, beginning in mid-January (I hope).


Nov. 23 | The months leading to the election of Biden inspired a lot of little projects which have been gathered into the “democratic America” project, which will develop further during 2021 (beyond its current ending, Nov. 22). Formation of the project is briefly discussed at “prospective reading as conceptual inquiry.”


Nov. 7 | Around 9;30 A.M., my neighborhood (near the university) sounded like late-night parties at various houses. When I saw news, I got tears.

Monday, November 23, 2020

prospective reading as conceptual inquiry



Considering thoughtful comment at a news article as dialogue with the text,
then an organization of comment segments into a thematic sequence of topics may instance a practice of theorizing from life (albeit journalistic narratives).

That’s a more improvisational version of engagement sentence-by-sentence
with others’ academic narratives, which can become tedious, but exemplifies discursive creativity, which performs detailed reading as formulation of conceptual stances and interpretive frames. I did that for many years via listserv forums. (Frankly, the potentials of discursive engagement and deconstructive work available through close reading make Frankfurt brand critique seem antique.)

I’ll eventually go back through my current improvisation to pull out the trans-situational themes and convene those into a relatively abstract narrative—
a discursive convention—which easily suggests longstanding conceptual prospecting by others, along with material that I didn’t use for today’s weave, which confined itself to existing comment elsewhere; or was oriented by that.

This posting will probably be expanded. When that happens, I’ll note it on
the home page. Meanwhile, a practical sense of conceptual prospecting expresses interest in discursive moment (i.e, potential general importance).



Friday, November 6, 2020

political interest as discursive fieldwork



The past few weeks, I linked to more of my comments at news articles than I ever have before, but that’s less than typical of the degree of commenting that I do, which is discursive field work.

Friday, September 18, 2020

american humanity



When Joe Biden avowed in mid-August that “the soul of America is on the ballot,” he was as vitally accurate as the so-called “Idea of America” is readily forgotten by predatory politics.

Twelve years beyond Obama’s 2004 declaration that “there is no Red America, there is no Blue America; there is the united states of America,” he hallmarked the humanity of the American Idea at the U.N. and at Hiroshima. Then, last month he avowed the sacredness of our citizenship.

I’ve wanted to show how the integral futurity of oneSself flourishing is the point of historical value, the soul of humanism (upcoming), the appeal of humanities (more coming), and the humanitarian heart of enlightened governance (never ending).

The soul of one’s life is always on the road to making and keeping the soul of one’s neighborhood as largely horizoned as one’s region needs from everyone for thriving.

Can the promise of American democracy depend on cherishing the “impossible” Idea of being an American soul?

The question is fun to explore.


next—> “humanity of Our potentiating futurity



Thursday, September 17, 2020

summer 2020



Things are evolving. I thought I’d have more of my current project to upload by now, but I’m a victim of themic mitosis, which is when a topic divides itself into longer subtopics than earlier anticipated. Five became eight first-level topics, and several of those have divided themselves (they do it without my initiative—phenomenally speaking) into several second-level topics each.

I believe I’ve recovered from the mitosis, so progress should be good before next check-in.


Sept. 5 | “being an American (with conceptual issues)” is a prospective venture in light of the four leading lights of the 2020 Democratic National Convention. It results in a sense of political virtue; and is the first part of an 8-part project that I hope to finish—I expect to finish—before the election of Biden opens a new era of American and global politics.