Saturday, April 10, 2021

spring 2021


See the site home page for the current update.

If you didn't see the American Masters episode on Oliver Sacks’s life, you must. It’s two hours, but the last 45 minutes makes it all worthwhile. Entertaining memoir becomes a report from the front lines of prospecting in neurophenomen-
ology, then offering a truly memorable ending filmed during the days of February, 2015, when he wrote “My Own Life” for the New York Times


Saturday, February 13, 2021

winter 2021


See the site home page for the current update.

I have 18 non-political topics I want to discuss intently (i.e., not casually) soon—over the next month or so—but I need a few more days before beginning here. Those 18 will form a constellational set that is to be the first and longest part of nine (seven shorter ones and another long one). I hope to begin putting new items online next week. | March 3: The first of the 18 is available, “personhood…,” and the other 17 are consolidated for detailing and sharing; but I’m unsure when I’ll give time to those (and the other eight) because I want to wander back into more-creative writing.


Friday, January 8, 2021

a vote for notes of fairness



Someone who is interested in the notion of public sphere these days caused me
to reply with some references and comment that I want to share, but expand.

Coincidently, New York Times journalist Thomas Edsall has this week re-raised issues of free speech with legal scholars in view of the authoritarian behavior of Trump (nothing new!—but now more dangerous than ever) and in view of the free reign of right-wing opinion in “viral” social spaces.

That dramatizes how philosophy of law is not basically about academic dispute. It’s about how we make and keep society good, humane, and, to my mind—and to Habermas, surely—make and keep society pragmatically progressive, which is also to say progressively pragmatic.

And that’s not mere academicism. What we are to do pertains to the scale of relevance that is each person’s daily life: being well, always being open to learning fundamentally new ways of thinking, and promoting community.